T.r.æ.k.a.s.s.e

Inside, I put my mind

scienceisbeauty:

New York-based artist Phillip Stearns created the surreal shot as part of his High Voltage  series by zapping Polaroid instant film with 15,000 volts.

"The fractal patterns produced by electrical discharge — known as Lichtenberg figures — are the footprint of the electric forces at play. What was striking was their resemblance to the distribution of blood vessels in the retina. It’s uncanny.”

Via Wired.co.uk

Reblogged from scienceisbeauty

scienceisbeauty:

New York-based artist Phillip Stearns created the surreal shot as part of his High Voltage  series by zapping Polaroid instant film with 15,000 volts.

"The fractal patterns produced by electrical discharge — known as Lichtenberg figures — are the footprint of the electric forces at play. What was striking was their resemblance to the distribution of blood vessels in the retina. It’s uncanny.”

Via Wired.co.uk

Hai, pagi, bertemu kembali denganmu.

Saat terik tidak lagi segan menyampaikan pesan mentari

serta gemerlap cahaya yang terpantul dari rumput dan tanah yang kering

Menambahkan suasana ceria dan hangat yang tersembunyi

di balik malam dengan kabut dan angin yang dingin

^^^cheers oh cheers^^^

Reblogged from modestanimalboi

nubbsgalore:

fireflies in timelapse, photos by (click pic) vincent bradytakehito miyataketsuneaki hiramatsu and spencer black

rhamphotheca:

The Hidden Patterns Created by Animals in Flight
by Robbie Gonzalez
Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed nature footage, Photoshop, and Illustrator to map the wingbeats of five different species. The result is a visually arresting confluence of art and science that reveals the patterns hidden in animal flight. Trust us on this one – you’ll want to see this.
Lutz, who recently received her bachelors in molecular biology, regularly combines her interest in science with her considerable design talents to create some of the most gorgeous information visualizations we’ve ever seen. Her latest creation, seen here, illustrates patterns traced by the wingbeats of geese, dragonflies, bats, moths, and hummingbirds…
(read more at i09)

Reblogged from rhamphotheca

rhamphotheca:

The Hidden Patterns Created by Animals in Flight

by Robbie Gonzalez

Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed nature footage, Photoshop, and Illustrator to map the wingbeats of five different species. The result is a visually arresting confluence of art and science that reveals the patterns hidden in animal flight. Trust us on this one – you’ll want to see this.

Lutz, who recently received her bachelors in molecular biology, regularly combines her interest in science with her considerable design talents to create some of the most gorgeous information visualizations we’ve ever seen. Her latest creation, seen here, illustrates patterns traced by the wingbeats of geese, dragonflies, bats, moths, and hummingbirds…

(read more at i09)

Reblogged from hexplosino

satr9:

New Hampshire moths are practically sparrows. Two Luna moths, and a Polyphemus moth

awesome moth :B

Reblogged from rhamphotheca

(Source: amysfarm)

sciencesoup:

Gel Electrophoresis
There’s a cool experiment you can do with DNA, and you only really need to know one thing: it’s a negatively charged molecule, since phosphate is negatively charged and DNA is largely made up of its sugar-phosphate backbone. The experiment is called Gel Electrophoresis, and essentially, it separates molecules based on size. Biologists use it to figure out the size of a DNA samples by seeing how far they move through a substance as compared to how far DNA fragments of known size move through the same substance.
A common substance is agarose gel, which can be easily set on a glass slide. While it’s setting, you create little wells in one end—pockets to insert your DNA into later. Usually you’ll have several samples of DNA of varying, unknown sizes combined with loading buffer, which weighs down your sample so it stays comfortably in the gel.

(Source: Wikimedia Commons)
To get started, your gel is placed into a gel electrophoresis chamber, which is essentially just a tank where you can apply a voltage and create an electric field. Running buffer is added to the tank to cover the gel, and then you insert your DNA samples into the wells. You also have a sample of DNA fragments of known size, and you usually put those on either side of your unknown samples so you can compare later.

(Source: camerazn)
When you apply a voltage across the tank, the DNA will start to move—the pores of the agarose gel act like a sieve. Since DNA is negatively charged, it will be repulsed from the negative end of the tank and migrate through the gel towards the positive end. The fragments travel parallel to each other in lanes: smaller fragments travel faster and further, and the longer fragments travel slower.
Eventually, some of the smaller molecules will have travelled all the way through the gel, and you should turn off the voltage. But at this point, you can’t clearly see where they all are, since they’re so small. So after applying a voltage, you remove the gel and stain it. Under UV light, it will be flurorescent—so voila, you can take an picture and you should see something like this:

(Source: Wikimedia Commons)
On the far left you can see the known sample, and by doing a little bit of maths and comparison, you can figure out the sizes of your DNA fragments.
Gel electrophoresis is has a bunch of applications in forensics, microbiology, genetics, biochemistry and molecular biology.
Further resources: Interactive explorations of the experiment here and here, and a more detailed look at the process from Osmania University

Reblogged from sciencesoup

sciencesoup:

Gel Electrophoresis

There’s a cool experiment you can do with DNA, and you only really need to know one thing: it’s a negatively charged molecule, since phosphate is negatively charged and DNA is largely made up of its sugar-phosphate backbone. The experiment is called Gel Electrophoresis, and essentially, it separates molecules based on size. Biologists use it to figure out the size of a DNA samples by seeing how far they move through a substance as compared to how far DNA fragments of known size move through the same substance.

A common substance is agarose gel, which can be easily set on a glass slide. While it’s setting, you create little wells in one end—pockets to insert your DNA into later. Usually you’ll have several samples of DNA of varying, unknown sizes combined with loading buffer, which weighs down your sample so it stays comfortably in the gel.

image

(Source: Wikimedia Commons)

To get started, your gel is placed into a gel electrophoresis chamber, which is essentially just a tank where you can apply a voltage and create an electric field. Running buffer is added to the tank to cover the gel, and then you insert your DNA samples into the wells. You also have a sample of DNA fragments of known size, and you usually put those on either side of your unknown samples so you can compare later.

image

(Source: camerazn)

When you apply a voltage across the tank, the DNA will start to move—the pores of the agarose gel act like a sieve. Since DNA is negatively charged, it will be repulsed from the negative end of the tank and migrate through the gel towards the positive end. The fragments travel parallel to each other in lanes: smaller fragments travel faster and further, and the longer fragments travel slower.

Eventually, some of the smaller molecules will have travelled all the way through the gel, and you should turn off the voltage. But at this point, you can’t clearly see where they all are, since they’re so small. So after applying a voltage, you remove the gel and stain it. Under UV light, it will be flurorescent—so voila, you can take an picture and you should see something like this:

image

(Source: Wikimedia Commons)

On the far left you can see the known sample, and by doing a little bit of maths and comparison, you can figure out the sizes of your DNA fragments.

Gel electrophoresis is has a bunch of applications in forensics, microbiology, genetics, biochemistry and molecular biology.

Further resources: Interactive explorations of the experiment here and here, and a more detailed look at the process from Osmania University

Reblogged from staceythinx

staceythinx:

Conrad Jon Godly’s paintings of mountains are so textured they appear to protrude and drip right off of the canvas

awesome…

i could hold something more than this :B

Reblogged from cunt0z

i could hold something more than this :B

(Source: stuporem)

Reblogged from conlapsio

(Source: imagrowlithegrrr)